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How to knit wrapped stitches

 

This little jacket features a cute wrapped stitch pattern, and the Bamboo Pop yarn I used to make the jacket is just perfect to show off these stitches. You’ll want to avoid fuzzy or tweedy yarns because the stitches won’t show that well, and your efforts will be slightly invisible.

One tricky aspect about this stitch pattern is that the term “wrapped” is used in two different ways as you work through the pattern. But we’ll soon clear this all up with some step-by-step instructions.

Baby sweater with wrapped stitches
Baby sweater with wrapped stitches

 

Wrapped Stitches Pattern

Cast on a multiple of 6 plus 1 (for symmetry) stitches, and then 4 more so you have 2 edge stitches on each side. These 2 pairs of edge stitches stabilize the pattern so the edges don’t pucker or flare.

Knit 6 rows in stockinette stitch.

Row 1 (RS): Sl first st knitwise, knit to last st, p1.

Row 2: Sl first st knitwise, knit to last st, p1.

And now we’re going to work on the other kind of wrap with a contrasting color.

Row 3: Sl first st knitwise, k2, *when knitting next st, wrap yarn around needle 3 times, knit next st wrapping yarn 2 times, k1, knit next st wrapping yarn 2 times, knit next st wrapping yarn 3 times, k1; rep from * across to last 2 sts, k1, p1.

So let’s look at these a little closer.

Here’s what it looks like to wrap 3 times before knitting the stitch.

3 wraps before knitting the stitch
3 wraps before knitting the stitch

 

Then the next stitch is wrapped twice, like so.

Wrapped twice
Wrapped twice

 

Then the third stitch is a straight knit. The fourth stitch is a double wrap, and the 5th is a triple wrap.

When the whole row is done, it’ll look like you have way more stitches on the needle than you do in the row below the needle, but this isn’t a problem.

Many wrapped stitches
Many wrapped stitches

 

Row 4: Sl first st knitwise, k2, *bring yarn forward, slip next 5 sts onto RH needle allowing extra wraps to drop, take yarn back, sl 5 sts back to LH needle, bring yarn forward, sl 5 sts to RH needle, take yarn back, sl 5 sts back to LH needle, bring yarn forward, sl 5 sts to RH needle, knit next st on left needle; rep from * across to last 2 sts, k1, p1.

Group of 5 sts wrapped fully twice
Group of 5 sts wrapped fully twice

 

Each bundle or what looks to me like a sheave of wheat (or yarn) is then nicely wrapped and separated by a stitch on each side of it.

Row 5: With main color, sl first st knitwise, taking care to work into each of the 5 sts in the bundles separately, knit across to last  st, p1.

Row 6: Rep row 2.

Row 7: With contrasting color, sl first st knitwise, k4, *knit next st wrapping yarn 3 times, knit next st wrapping yarn 2 times, k1, knit next st wrapping yarn 2 times, knit next st wrapping yarn 3 times, k1; rep from * across to last 4 sts, k3, p1.

Row 8: Sl 1 knitwise, k4, *wrap next 5 sts twice as in row 4, k1; rep from * across to last 4 sts, k3, p1.

Rows 9 & 10: Rep Rows 5 & 6.

Yarn Sheaves Stitch Pattern
Yarn Sheaves Stitch Pattern

 

Another way to make the little sheaves is to slip the five stitches with extra wraps onto a cable needle or spare double pointed needle dropping the extra wraps as you do. Then take the yarn and wrap it around the 5 stitches twice, and then return the stitches to the RH needle and proceed across.

It’s a lovely stitch pattern and with the crispness of Bamboo Pop, it looks really great with excellent stitch definition. I hope you try it and think of a use for this stitch pattern in your exciting knitting projects.

This is part 5 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 4:  3 projects I would knit with Bamboo Pop yarn

 

About Charles Voth

I’m Charles Voth, a crochet and knitting professional. I enjoy reviewing yarns and tools to help others find materials that will help them be happy with what they stitch. I design garments and accessories and items for the home. I teach both crafts at yarn stores, in schools, and at craft shows and retail events. I am also a technical editor of both crochet and knitting patterns and illustrate the charts and diagrams that make pattern reading accessible to so many.

4 Comments

  1. Cairine

    Thank you for the lesson as I had been having trouble with this.

  2. Trudy H.

    Found your introductory information very interesting and educating re origin and nature of yarn, and how it can best be utilized in a project. You have an easy-to-understand way of explaining the why(s) and wherefor(s) of stitch utilizing, problems (pooling), etc. So glad I came to your website. Am looking forward to more posts via email from you.

    Now, how do I access the promised freebie e-book pattern?

    • Hi Trudy, thank you for visiting KNITmuch! I’m glad to hear you’re enjoying it! To get the free downloadable ebook, click ‘download FREE PDF’ below ‘Cynthia MacDougall’s Knitting Essentials’.

    • Hello Trudy. I’m glad that my explanations are helpful to you.

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