Knitting border blocks on a log cabin blanket

This week we’re bringing a bit of the seventies into 2023 with a log cabin knit blanket called Rockwell, a free pattern from Lion Brand Yarn). This thick cozy blanket knits up quickly with super bulky Hue+Me wool and large US 13 Lantern Moon Destiny needles. And we are almost done! Over the past four days I’ve shown you what materials you need, how to start the blanket with the first square, then how to make this blanket grow with a series of bound-off blocks and picked-up stitches. Yesterday, I also shared how to keep knitting more comfortably with some simple, easy neck, back, and hip stretches. Today, we’re wrapping this blanket up with the final four blocks that make up the border edge. I’ll also be finishing up this post with one final yoga stretch for knitters that will blow your mind because it works all the stress areas! But, first, let’s get blocks 17-18 done.

The Rockwell blanket – retro chic at its best.

Border block 17

The next two blocks, 17 and 18, follow the same pattern as all the previous blocks. All four of the border blocks are done in color A. I hope you picked up an extra skein! I ran short in mine and had to pick up the last two borders in another color (I chose Werewolf black).

For block 17, using color A, pick up 1 stitch at the bind-off edge of block 16 then 9 stitches of garter edge. Move on to pick up the 80 remaining stitches of the bind-off edge of block 15 (see graphic below). Knit the number of rows required in the pattern, then bind them off.

Follow the direction of the arrow to pick up stitches from right to left for block 17 across block 16 then block 15.

Block 18

Continuing with color A (Desert), pick up one stitch for each of the 114 remaining bind off stitches on block 16 then pick up 4 stitches along the garter stitch edge of block 17 (see graphic below). Knit the required number of rows in the pattern and bind off. Knit the number of rows required in the pattern, then bind them off.

Follow the direction of the arrow to pick up stitches for block 18 across block 16 then block 17.

Block 19

Block 19 is where things get a little tricky. We’re breaking with the log cabin pattern of this blanket that was built upon the right and the top side of each set of blocks. For the first time, stitches are picked up at the bottom. Make sure to read the instructions carefully as the stitches are now picked up from the left side of the blanket to the right side.

Continuing with color A, pick up the first 13 cast-on stitches of block 1 (these are picked up the same way as bind-off stitches.) Then pick garter ridge side stitches of all the other blocks right to block 18. Pick up 20 stitches for block 2, 13 stitches for block 4, 7 stitches for block 6, 11 stitches for block 8, 3 stitches for block 10, 5 stitches for block 12, 8 stitches for block 14, 9 stitches for block 16, and 4 stitches for block 18 (see graphic below). You should have 93 stitches in total. Knit the number of rows required in the pattern, then bind them off.

Follow the direction of the arrow to pick up stitches from right to left for block 19 across blocks 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 14, 16, and 18.

Block 20

The last block!!! You’ll notice this last block is made along the left side of the blanket going from top to bottom. Continue using color A and starting at the right side edge of block 17, pick up 1 bind off stitch then pick up 4 stitches of the garter ridge edge. Continue to pick up one stitch for each garter ridge at the edges as follows: 3 stitches for block 15, 9 stitches for block 13, 7 stitches for block 11, 15 stitches for block 9, 11 stitches for block 7, 13 stitches for block 5, 50 stitches for block 3, 13 stitches for block 1, and 4 stitches for block 19 (see graphic below). You should now have 130 stitches. Knit the required number of rows in the pattern and bind off.

Follow the direction of the arrow to pick up stitches for block 20 across blocks 17, 15, 13, 11, 9, 7, 5, 3, 1, and 19.

The big stretch before the finish!

Congratulations you made it to the end! And now you have a gorgeous new 1970s retro chic Rockwell blanket. All you need to do is weave in your ends. But before you get to that task it’s time for one last yoga stretch to relax from all your hard work and get your body ready to finish your blanket. The video below, from a series of stretches for knitters by Lion Brand Yarns, has the women sitting on the floor, but if that’s too difficult you can sit at the edge of a chair instead. Remember to be gentle with your stretching and never go to the point of pain. A bit of pull, yes, but no ouchies!

A short video by Lion Brand for yoga stretches that work on all of your upper body including your hands!

Now, weave in your ends. You’re done!

A quick note before I say goodbye

I’m so grateful that you knit along with me to make your very own log cabin style Rockwell blanket using Lion Brand Yarns Hue+Me super bulky wool. I hope you found the Lantern Moon Destiny Ebony needles helpful in carrying the weight of so many stitches in a more balanced way. I also hope the stretches I shared throughout this week made knitting this bulky project a little more comfortable as your hands stitched their way to the finish line. One quick note before I go; I didn’t feel the need to block my Rockwell. I felt like the weight of the yarn did that for me, and I kind of like the rustic look it had without blocking. That’s all I have to share. Now, get cozied up under your new toasty and nostalgic ‘70s-inspired blanket, and begin dreaming of your next great knitting adventure!

This is part 5 of 5 in this series

Go back to part 4: Log cabin knitting: The final stretch to a retro Rockwell blanket

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