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Knitting a hat with cables without crossing cables, what?

 

Yesterday I did a brief overview of Uptown Worsted Mist, a new yarn from the Uptown Worsted family, I was curious to see how it would knit up. One of the easy and quick items to knit when sampling a new yarn is a hat, but the one I’ll be talking about today, jumped out at me. It appealed to me mostly because it looks like it has cables without actually going through the trouble of crossing any cables.

See the various selection of colorways for the Uptown Worsted Mist and the very many fun patterns to knit up.

 

The product photo of the Overcast Cap in a solid grey color. Uptown Worsted Mist is going to be a variegated grey with white. It should look interesting!
The product photo of the Overcast Cap in a solid grey color. Uptown Worsted Mist is going to be a variegated grey with white. It should look interesting!

 

The pattern for Overcast Cap is very sleek and well written. If you read through the whole pattern first, you’ll see what I mean. The actual stitch repeat is laid out in a separate section, for easy reference. Not that you’ll need it; the pattern is very easy to memorize. The actual pattern doesn’t repeat the stitch pattern, it just refers you to the above pattern and tells you how many repeats to do before starting the crown shaping.

 

See the cast on edge? It's plain and knit upwards from there.
See the cast on edge? It’s plain and knit upwards from there.

 

One aspect about the Overcast Cap that I absolutely love is the fact that there is no ribbed edge. I think it really gives the garment a couture look. If you’re worried about the hat slipping off, don’t concern yourself. The whole hat is knit in a K2P1 rib, so you get the ribbed effect without the plain ribbed look.

Ribbing has been around forever, it’s been done over and over again the same way. I always love to see new ways to incorporate it into patterns. Knitting the Overcast Cap with Uptown Worsted Mist works well. The original pattern was specified for a DK weight yarn and Uptown Worsted, is worsted. DK is slightly smaller than a worsted weight, but another great aspect to this hat is the amount of stretch it has. Since the whole thing is knit in a rib, if your gauge is a little off, it isn’t the end of the world.

 

A close up shot so you can see all the little purl ditches. This makes the whole hat ribbed and easy to fit different sized noggins.
A close up shot so you can see all the little purl ditches. This makes the whole hat ribbed and easy to fit different sized noggins.

 

The stitch that makes the cabled look is a Right Twist (RT), also called the Mock Cable Stitch. This was the first time I had encountered that stitch in a pattern. Just looking at the title of the stitch I would have thought it was a stitch twisted to the right, which is a fairly common occurrence. This stitch is really nothing like that. The official instructions say “K2tog but do not slip st from ndl, knit the first st again, slip both sts from ndl.”

When I read it without my knitting in front of me, I wasn’t sure what the heck they were talking about. If you just came across this pattern, it could be confusing; I’m a very visual learner, so I have to see it. However, once I sat down with my knitting and cast on, it made total sense when I looked at it.

 

It's an incredibly comfy hat. Uptown Worsted Mist really makes a soft and warm hat.
It’s an incredibly comfy hat. Uptown Worsted Mist really makes a soft and warm hat.

 

The Overcast Cap is a beautiful piece to add to your fall wardrobe. The icing on the cake is the fact that it isn’t difficult to knit. Yeah! The pattern is relaxing to knit and cozy to wear, and in the end someone gets to wear a warm hat. Join me tomorrow as I go over how to customize the Overcast Cap pattern.

 

This is part 2 of 5 in this series.
Go back to part 1: Uptown Worsted Mist, an anti-pilling acrylic yarn

About Michelle Nguyen

Michelle Nguyen is founder and creative director of Stitch Please Yarns. She originally got into the fiber arts business writing about knitting at her blog Stitches be Slippin, and now, also writes for KNITmuch.com.

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