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Making the Fall Berries Shawl using the multi-colored Hopscotch yarn

by Michelle Nguyen

 

I’m trying out Red Heart’s Fall Berries Shawl and knitting it using Hopscotch yarn. I know what you’re thinking, this pattern has a textured stitch so why am I using multi-colored yarn?! What is happening?!?

No worries my friends because I intentionally chose this pattern to work specifically with Hopscotch yarn. When I talk about choosing the right pattern for the right yarn, as I went over briefly yesterday, I think it’s important to add more details on the topic. While a plain yarn will make this stitch really pop, some knitters may love how it turns out in Hopscotch. I’m taking this opportunity to walk on the wild side and show you what it looks like!

The lovely textured Fall Berries Shawl

The lovely textured Fall Berries Shawl

 

I will tell you that there was a significant difference between the shawl before and after I blocked it. I have been steam blocking my garments lately, which involves putting an iron on low heat and the steam setting. Then placing an ironing cloth between the garment and the iron while I iron it.

This is the best practice when the edges curl, but you’re also able to hold the iron above your knitting (not touching at all) and let the steam do the work for you. Acrylic yarn takes really well to steaming, but it definitely makes it relax the same way it would if you were washing it in the washing machine.

The Fall Berries Shawl in the color Waterslide, before blocking

The Fall Berries Shawl in the color Waterslide, before blocking

 

Knit up in Hopscotch yarn, the stitches are still visible, and you can tell that I knitted a textured stitch. I find however that the shawl knit up in Red Heart’s Soft yarn has a more uniform texture and the stitch pattern isn’t interrupted.

It’s entirely a matter of preference, perhaps you’ll want to choose color changes along with the texture. Or you prefer to see the more of the hills and valleys created by the pattern stitch.

If, however, you’re doing cables (or a bramble stitch) it will be more difficult to see the definition of the cable and pattern.

The Fall Berries Shawl in the color Waterslide, before blocking

The Fall Berries Shawl in the color Waterslide, before blocking

 

Now that you’ve seen how both variations look, you can make your own decision! The textured stitch will be warm no matter what it looks like. Within the pattern stitch of the Fall Berries Shawl, there’s a good possibility of warm air getting trapped within the texture,  keeping you nice and warm for the cooler weather which we all know is inevitably on its way.

 

This is part 2 of 3 in this series.
Go back to part 1: Multi-colored Hopscotch yarn makes it hard to skip the craft aisle

 

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